slowed ability to start and continue movements, and impaired ability to adjust the body's position.
a chemical that sends messages in the brain and helps to coordinate the body's movement.
the part of the nervous system that uses dopamine as a neurotransmitter.
familial tremor, benign essential tremor, hereditary tremor; a condition marked by uncontrollable shaking in the hands, head, or face, it is sometimes called familial tremor because it may run in families.
bradykinesia can affect the muscles of the face, just as it does all the other muscles in the body; the typical "mask-like" expression of the face occurs because the muscles aren't moving freely.
freezing means that you literally stop in space in the midst of whatever you are doing; your feet may appear to be glued to one spot; this is particularly common at doorways, curbs, and in front of elevators.
a change in walking patterns, often seen in a decrease in natural arm swing while taking steps.
body movements such as walking, balancing, holding objects, and speech.
any neurological disorder characterized by changes in muscle movement; for example, a parkinsonian syndrome or essential tremor movement disorder.
a neurological disorder characterized by low blood pressure after standing up, difficulty urinating, and irregular breathing while sleeping.
a physician who focuses on the nervous system.
any disease or medical condition that affects the brain and nervous system.
a decline in the areas of the brain that produce dopamine.
a disorder of the central nervous system that impairs one's motor skills and speech.
a group of nerve disorders with symptoms including muscle tremors and stiffness, slowed movements, and impaired balance.
a scan that provides two- and three-dimensional pictures of brain activity by measuring radioactive isotopes that are injected into the bloodstream to determine brain changes following injury or drug abuse, among other uses. PET may be ordered as a follow-up to a CT or MRI scan.
impaired balance; affected people also may develop a stooped posture in which the head is bowed and the shoulders are drooped.
a brain disorder that causes serious problems with walking, balance, and eye movements. Progressive supranuclear palsy results from deterioration of cells in areas of your brain that control movement.
the muscle tone of someone with PS may be tight and stiff either at rest or when in motion; if someone is experiencing rigidity, they may feel stuck and stiff and also appear stiff to other people when they try to move.
the normal sleep cycle may be disturbed with PS, and it is common to be able to fall asleep but then to wake frequently throughout the night; other sleep problems include having trouble staying awake during the day and having to take many catnaps, or talking, kicking, or jerking while asleep.
a nuclear imaging test involving blood flow to tissue, is used to evaluate certain brain functions. The test may be ordered as a follow-up to an MRI.
dopamine-producing brain cells.
tremor (or shaking) is an involuntary, rhythmic movement of part or parts of the body.
a soft voice is characteristic of PS, as is getting enough variation in volume and emotion; speaking quickly and crowding words together is typical, as is speaking in a monotone.
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